Harnessing the power
of everyday life to
build strength

Fundamentals for Everyday Life

Acquiring solid fundamentals applied to everyday life empowers us and puts us in the driver’s seat of our own health and well-being. It allows us to self correct and tighten the right muscles while maintaining good form. Daily life movements then becomes a source of strength, making the body stronger each day.

Relaxed Breathing

Correct breathing is the foundation of core strength. Many people never learn to breathe properly often resorting to holding their breath during exercise.

Paula teaches how to breathe properly; creating lateral rib cage expansion, relaxed shoulders, and the important ability to breathe and tighten the core at the same time. 

The benefits of learning to breathe correctly are not only a strong core, but less pain, greater lung capacity, better daily life function as well as good posture.

Core Strength

Traditionally we think of the core as a six pack that can be held for an instant. But the core needs to be able to do much more than that. A strong core is smart core. It needs to be able to tighten during the many diverse activities of daily life; engaging not only for a short time, but have endurance and hold for longer periods of time; hold lightly versus strongly; react reflexively; as well as have awareness that enables it to tighten in different body positions. 

Good Posture

Paula uses her propriety “skeletal approach” to good posture. It is a simple, effective and efficient technique. It gives the students a clear guidepost or template, with visual and tactile cues enabling self-correction during the day. This approach views the structure of the skeleton as the foundation of creating good posture.

Students have flown from other states to learn this technique having seen the remarkable improvements in the posture of their family and friends.

Hip Hinge - Bending

Hip hinge protects the back when bending over by putting it into neutral spine, versus a rounded back position making it more vulnerable to injury. 

Doing a hip hinge while doing daily tasks such as lifting children, groceries, laundry, getting on/off the toilet etc. protects the back and develops glute, core and leg strength. It is also an important aspect of athletic movements. 

Paula teaches all her students how to properly hip hinge as it is one of the most important and commonly used functional movements in life.

I'm Paula Morizono


Paula has been teaching fitness since 1999. She has taught in clinics, pilates studios, gyms, corporate settings, and as an LAUSD teacher in the largest older adult program in the state of California. With her many years of experience she has concluded that what most people are missing is the foundation of movement underlying everyday tasks, as well as athletic pursuits. She helps each student develop these foundations of breathing, core, posture and hip hinge.     

Her proprietary approach to posture, called the “Skeletal Approach” is unique to her style of teaching and is effective, efficient and very popular. Many students initially start working with her for posture. But also learn the other foundational areas of core, breathing and hip hinge.

She trains students, in gyms, pilates studios, home settings and conducts ergonomic office assessments. She is also available for virtual consults.

Alice H

Constant Pain

Paula is absolutely amazing before I came into take these sessions I was in pain constantly feeling unmotivated and having a hard time finding my core . I highly recommend Paula for these sessions . I found my core she showed me so many different ways to improve my form and because I sit all day for my job she knew it was important for me to make sure I was doing everything possible to improve my everyday habits ! She is the best in LA . I wouldn't go anywhere else !

What Clients Say...

Is this you?

Do you suffer from back pain?

There could be many different causes of back pain; pressure on the discs, leg discrepancies, back surgeries, etc; however, I believe the main cause is poor posture, incorrect mechanics, and a weak core. Even if someone has a thinning disc and previous injuries pain can be lessened or eliminated with a strong core and correct mechanics. I teach both of these fundamental principles for a strong back.

Do you need a stronger core?

Traditionally we think of the core as a six pack that can be held for an instant. But the core needs to be able to do much more than that. A strong core is smart core. It needs to be able to tighten during the many diverse activities of daily life; engaging not only for a short time, but have endurance and hold for longer periods of time; hold lightly versus strongly; react reflexively; as well as have awareness that enables it to tighten in different body positions.

Do you want to improve your posture?

Paula uses the propriety “skeletal approach” to good posture. It is a simple, effective and efficient technique. It gives the students a clear guidepost or template, with visual and tactile cues enabling self-correction during the day. This approach views the structure of the skeleton as the foundation of creating good posture.

Students have flown from other states to learn this technique having seen the remarkable improvements in the posture of their family and friends.

Are you a baby boomer that wants a program that will keep you fit for life?

Every year life span lengthens. We are living longer and longer. To stay fit and independent throughout our lives we need to exercise. But what kind of exercise? For many years I taught the largest class sponsored by the state and saw many examples of fit seniors. Through seeing their examples coupled with my own knowledge I’ve been able to create an effective system of keeping people fit for life. Some of the most important points; balance is essential, core strength is important, awareness of posture is critical, and the squat movement is indispensable. I teach all these skills that can and should be maintained throughout one’s life.

Are you an older adult that wants to be strong in functional movements to maintain independence?

The only way to maintain functional movement is to practice it. I go over all basic movements of functional living with my students. Having worked in every senior facility in my former school district including nursing homes, retirement homes, adult day health cares, Alzheimer’s facilities, and gyms with seniors still independent and living at home; I have come to the conclusion that of all movements the squat movement is the most important functional movement and the one that must be maintained in order to retain independence. I go over and over this movement with all my students.

Do you have an injury and need a customized program?

I see my students and I as a team. We work together to implement a program that is best suited to your individual needs. If you have a physical therapist, I can also work with him/her. I have worked in a large physical therapy clinic teaching Pilates and am familiar with their protocol. As your body becomes stronger, the program will change and become more advanced addressing your body’s ability to execute more challenging workouts.

Have you ever fallen?

The article “Fear of Falling,” in the December 2015 AARP Bulletin states that falling is now the number one cause of emergency room visits for those 45 years and older and it continues to substantially increase. Having taught seniors, I witnessed the problem firsthand. I test all my student’s balance and then create a balance program they can use at home. A large part of balance is core strength as well as fast twitch muscle response. I address both important aspects of balance and fall prevention.

Do you want to improve your form in the gym?

Unlike Pilates, the gym environment loads the body with often large amounts of weight. Anytime weight is added correct form is critical. In addition to correct form the core must be engaged. Another crucial set of muscles are the gluteal muscles. I find those who do gym workouts often do not sufficiently activate their gluteal muscles. I am an ACE certified personal trainer, so I am familiar with all the gym moves. I teach correct mechanics in addition to core and gluteal activation.

Are you a health practitioner (chiropractor, nurse, caregiver etc.) that wants to strengthen your core and form for injury prevention as well as longevity in your profession?

Some professions require physical strength and/or stamina. Being injured on the job is a very common occurrence. Many employers give mandatory training showing how to move and lift on the job, but still many people continue to get injured on the job. I ask my students to show me the moves they do on their job so we can recreate it and strengthen those functional movements to prevent injury.

Michael G

Gym Owner

I own a powerlifting/strength training gym, and have trained in wrestling, jiu jitsu, strength and power lifting for years. I started training with Paula 2 years ago and love this work. Training with Paula has helped me develop core strength with a neutral spine versus with spinal inflexion and correcting some habits I had. A big result of training with Paula is that my posture has improved, so I look younger, because I'm standing straight and I'm aware of how I'm holding myself.